Henry Vinson

A Legal Professional in Cincinnati, Ohio

Oddest Ohio Laws

Oddest Ohio Laws

Laws have a gravity of all their own. They determine the rules of our society, chart the penalties after our misdeeds, and lay the very foundation for how our communities function on a daily basis. Sometimes, though, these solemn laws can be remarkably silly.

 

Off-kilter mandates exist in every community, and are often shared predominantly via word-of-mouth gossip and blog posts that are equal parts indignant and amused. But what most people don’t necessarily realize is that some – if not all – of the laws they roll their eyes over are either taken out of context, exaggerated, or outright fabricated. Let’s take the oft-quoted “five women in a house” law as an example of the last.

 

If you visit a college campus and ask around, you’ll probably hear someone say that the sororities on campus aren’t permitted to have houses due to a local anti-brothel law that forbids more than five women from living in a house. Many are quite reasonably angry about this – but if you take a closer look into the county legislature, you probably won’t find that particular law on the books. One writer for the hoax-debunking site Snopes summarized her investigation into the matter as follows: “We routinely hear from students who are convinced their particular university lacks a sorority because of this non-existent law. Their vehemence aside, none have yet produced a copy of the statute they so firmly believe in, an act that would earn their city and institution of higher learning a measure of fame in the world of contemporary lore.” Sororities might encounter unfair barriers to establishing their own housing – but odds are, that block won’t be an outdated anti-brothel law.

 

All this said, remnants of outdated Puritanical mandates and long-passed civil cases do still float about in local and state legislature. Below, I’ve listed just a few standout lines from Ohio state law. Enjoy!

 

Statewide Laws

 

Women must not wear patent leather shoes in public.

 

It is illegal to fish for whales on Sunday.

 

It is illegal to get a fish drunk.

 

No civil arrests can be made on Sundays or on the 4th of July.

 

Conducting or participating in a duel is illegal.

 

You must honk whenever you pass another car.

 

Odd Town-Specific Laws

 

Canton, Ohio

If a person loses their pet tiger, they must notify the authorities within an hour.

 

Bexley, Ohio

The installation or usage of slot machines in outhouses is forbidden.

 

Bay Village, Ohio

It is illegal to walk your cow down Lake Road.

 

Cleveland, Ohio

It is illegal to catch mice without a hunting license.


Toledo, Ohio

It is illegal to throw a snake at another person.

Early Career Advice For Young Lawyers

Early Career Advice For Young Lawyers

 

Law school is over and you’ve finally secured your first job – but now what? Getting to this point may have seemed like a marathon and yet your entire career still lies ahead. There are many questions to still be answered and many unknowns that have not yet been encountered. I understand firsthand how difficult the early-career uncertainty can be to deal with, which is why I’ve compiled following list of early career tips for young lawyers. I based the points I outline here on my own experience as a lawyer, looking back on what I wished I had known when I first started my career. The tips, in no particular order, are as follows:

 

Build Relationships Early And Often

 

Always Ask Questions

 

Treat Your Profession As A Business

 

Build Relationships Early And Often

 

Lawyers never know when a contact made years ago may become useful. The law community tends to look out for one another and thus relationships can serve early lawyers favorably. Not only is the benefit of learning from other experienced professionals gained, but also the possibility of opening up future career advancement. Top notch talent is always sought after and making connections ensures that a young lawyer will be considered for promotions at a variety of firms.

 

Always Ask Questions

 

The field of law is not only extremely difficult but it is changing virtually every single day. For this reason alone, asking questions frequently is of the utmost importance. Senior lawyers will be able to provide insight that goes far beyond the law books required for schooling. As the length of a career increases, a young lawyer can in turn answer the questions of the new generation of law professionals.

 

Treat Your Profession As A Business

 

Lawyers are always seeking to represent more clients. Thus, even though a young lawyer may be employed by a specific firm, it is important to treat the career as its own business. This includes frequently increasing marketability through additional education and certificates. With any luck, a young lawyer will someday start their own firm and truly be in control of a business which is self funded.

 

Career success in the field of law is determined by a variety of factors. While nothing is ever guaranteed, the probability of success as a young lawyer can be greatly increased if the above listed tips, as well as many others, are taken to heart and acted upon immediately upon beginning a career.

About Henry Vinson

Henry Vinson is a 10,000 hour commercial pilot with Single-Engine and Multi-Engine Airplane; Rotorcraft-Helicopter; Instrument-Airplane; Flight Instructor Airplane & Flight Instructor Helicopter ratings. Henry Vinson holds a Master of Science in Integrated Marketing Communications from West Virginia University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Mortuary Science from Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science. He is a member of the Public Relations Society of America, Airplane Owner and Pilot Association, American Marketing Association, American Communications Association, and Experimental Aircraft Association.

Henry Vinson was born in 1960 in South Williamson, Kentucky. He graduated from Williamson High School in 1979, and, after attending South West Virginia Community College, he enrolled in the Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science. In 1982, he was appointed the Coroner for Mingo County, West Virginia.

Four years later, he became a funeral director for W. W. Chambers Funeral Homein Washington, DC. After his stint at W. W. Chambers Funeral Home, he owned and operated the largest gay escort service ever uncovered in Washington, DC at the age of 26.

In 2007, Mr. Vinson received a Masters in Integrated Marketing Communications from West Virginia University, and today he is a successful entrepreneur who lives in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Following a successful career as a marketing and advertising consultant, Henry Vinson opted to return to school in 2014 to pursue a law degree. Vinson is currently enrolled in the Juris Doctor Program at William Howard Taft University, America’s oldest nationally accredited distance learning law school.